whales

Ways of Whales Workshop- Whidbey Island Orca Event

Learn about Orca Whales at this one-day-a-year whales workshop. For your information we share this excerpt from Whidbey-Camano Islands website:
Orca Network’s annual Ways of Whales Workshop will be held Saturday, January 20, 2018, 10:00 am until 4:30 pm at the Coupeville Middle School Performing Arts Center, 501 S. Main St, Coupeville, Whidbey Island, WA.
The 2018 Ways of Whales workshop features presentations on a wide variety of cetaceans, from blue and humpback whales to the endangered Southern Resident Community of orcas and their primary prey Chinook salmon.
You’ll need to take the Mukilteo – Clinton ferry to get on the Island, unless you come from the North, through Deception Pass. Who knows, maybe you see some Orcas on the way!

January 20 @ 10:00 am4:30 pm      $35

 for more information: http://www.orcanetwork.org
Whale book-Grannys Clan

Whale book-Grannys Clan

2 orcas

Orca Whales

Orca Whales

Whales feeding in Alaska-John Weeber

Whales feeding in Alaska-John Weeber

Olympic Peninsula Tour

No Elk sightings today on this Olympic Peninsula Tour, but the woods were alive with fresh water from the recent rains. You can feel the peace of the woods after a rain. The whole forest in Hoh, Lake Quinault, and Lake Crescent feel alive and breathing, deep and calm.

We did see 4 black tail deer, cows, horses, an eagle, some hawks, ducks, and a couple of slugs today. I know, cows and horses? Well, we never know when we’ll see actual wild life, so we watch for whatever we can see in the animal kingdom! Oddly, we have to look hard to find slugs. You’d think they’d be everywhere, but no, they hide well. The black ones and the Banana slugs.

The Olympic Peninsula has many rivers, which were higher due to the season. The Hoh river is quite full of glacial til, leaving the river a milky gray/teal color. it was very very pretty.

The Elwah river and the Hoh both have lots of new trees downed in the river bed, and the Hoh river has re-routed itself within the usual wide riverbed boundaries. It’s fun to see the changes each year.

Ruby Beach, on the Pacific Ocean, also has a new look. Every spring we show up to find the massive over-sized driftwood moved and shifted from the winter storms, and we get to find new ways to get to the beach. Today we decided to look at the beach from the cliff, then travel to Kalaloch where access is easier. Grey Whales were just past the breakers!  Kalaloch’s beach has more sand than drift wood. Of course we grabbed an espresso at the Kalaloch grocery before our journey back to Seattle, via Aberdeen and Olympia. Join us on a tour!  www.cherylsnwtours.com or cal

trail sign

trail sign

Halloween rock!

Halloween rock!

Sword Fern

Sword Fern

Kalaloch Beach

Kalaloch Beach

Olympic Mountains

Olympic Mountains